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Best Hatchet For Splitting Wood of 2022

Lorin Nielsen
  Sep 28, 2022 7:38 AM

We spent several hours searching the internet for best hatchet for splitting wood, reading reviews, and drawing on our own personal experiences to compile our list of the top 13 best hatchet for splitting wood now available on the market.


Overview

Many people value the comforting light of a wood-burning fireplace above all else, but purchasing fuel comes at a price. Costs can range from as low as $200 to as much as $400 for a cord (equal to 128 cubic feet) depending on where you reside. If you're fortunate enough to live near a grove of oak, maple, or ash trees and have the skills and know-how to harvest and split your own firewood, you can save money on this expense. Still, it's important to know how to choose the correct equipment for the job.

Axes can be, and frequently are, job-specific tools. Some of the best axes are very specialized and can only be used for a single task, while others are generalists. The axes on our list were rigorously tested in order to assist reduce the field to the best for specific tasks. Rounds of cedar and cottonwood trees were split with these saws. We tried splitting, producing kindling (little pieces of wood used to light a fire), pruning, and general clearing with a variety of these axes that operate as multipurpose tools.

These axes were put to the test by a number of people. The length and weight of the axes' handles, which are influenced by the user's height, were put to the test by two people with different heights: a 5-foot-11-inch male and a 5-foot-4-inch female. The sharpness of the blade, its weight, the axe's overall balance, and the quality of the materials were all noticed during testing. According to the axe's intended use, each and every one of these considerations was considered. In our tests and reviews, we made it clear that this was the case.

Read on if you plan to use an axe to split your own firewood and learn what to look for. You'll also learn why we believe the axes and hatchets listed below are among the best for most do-it-yourself lumberjacks.


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Last update on 2022-09-28 / Affiliate links / Images, Product Titles, and Product Highlights from Amazon Product Advertising API


Buying Guide

Type

The term "splitting maul" refers to an axe used for splitting wood. A splitting maul, on the other hand, is a little different. Wedge-shaped head and backside of sledgehammer-like maul are typical features. Splitting a massive log that's more than a foot in diameter can be improved by using the maul end of the sledgehammer as a splitting wedge (Check out step-by-step instruction on splitting logs).

A wedge-shaped blade on the end of a huge, heavy steel head (traditionally made of iron) adorns a splitting axe, allowing it to slice through a log down its grain with a single blow. The "maul" side of the head is absent from splitting axes, although they may have a flat side that can be used as a hammer.

As the name implies, the head of a felling axe is lighter than that of a splitting axe. The horizontal strokes of these models are intended to chip away at a standing tree in order to create the desired effect. These axes should be avoided when looking for a splitting axe because they aren't made to split wood with the grain.

Hatchets resemble axes but have shorter handles, ranging from 12 to 18 inches in length. Hatchets can be used for fine detail work, limbing, tiny splitting activities, and even modest tree felling. To produce kindling or to break apart tiny pieces of wood, they're not the best tools for splitting.

Axe Handle

Wood, fiberglass composite, or forged steel wrapped with rubber or a comparable material are all options for splitting axe handle materials.

There are many advantages to using a wood axe handle, including its low weight and pleasant feel to the hand. Wood handles, on the other hand, might wear out and need to be replaced over time. The strongest and most long-lasting handles are made from wood whose grain runs perpendicular to the blade's axis.

Despite the fact that fiberglass composite handles are smooth to the touch and can absorb part of the impact, they are prone to shattering in extremely cold temperatures. It can also break if the shaft, rather than the head, is struck by the bat during a mishit.

Many steel axe handles are formed in one piece, including the axe head and the handle, making them easier to transport and store. These are the most durable, but they don't absorb shock, which might lead to fatigue in the hands more quickly.. Hands will feel less shock if they have rubber or another shock-absorbent material on their handles.

Length

Just as significant is the material used to make an axe's handle when making a purchase. For example, you can choose between 14- and 36-inch-long handle options. The longer the axe, the more speed and power it can produce.

The longer the handle, the more difficult it is to hit an exact place on a log. Consider an axe with a 31-inch handle if you're just getting started. It's possible that a longer handle will become more appealing as one's skill improves. Shorter-handled axes are ideal for splitting kindling since they may be held in one hand.

Solid Piece versus a Multi-Piece Axe

Other folks like an axe that can be dismantled into its head and handle. It does make it easier to sharpen the axe head.

The axe head, on the other hand, could accidentally fly off. It is because of this reason that I actually prefer a solid-piece axe. They appear to be a touch more secure all-around. In the end though, it's a matter of personal choice.

Material

Axe handles come in a variety of materials, including fiberglass and wood. Almost all of them will be coated in varnish.

If you want a better grip, you should sand the varnish down. However, the material of the axe handle is a personal preference. In the end, it comes down to what works best for you and your hands.

As a result, before you buy an axe, do some research on this.

Hand forging

Commercial axe manufacturers typically produce and treat axes using machines. There is a huge price difference in camping axes because of the time and effort required to shape the metal without the use of technology. Axes created commercially aren't necessarily weaker than axes made by hand, but the labor-intensive process of hand forging an axe's steel head implies that hand forged axes are worth much more. Hand-forged axes typically have hand-carved handles, and many believe the overall product quality is superior to that of mass-produced axes.

Portability and weight

Camp axes are great tools for remote camping, but they're also a pain to bring along because they're so heavy. It's up to you to decide how heavy and bulky you'd like to get. For those looking for a more compact, lightweight option, some axes are available. Rather of removing a few finger-wide bits of deadwood, heavier models could be better suited to the aforementioned sequoia.

The grip

It is possible that a good grip will prevent your hand from slipping while you are swinging, thereby saving you a few toes.

The blade and the ‘bit’

The efficiency of a blade is largely determined by the material it is made of, although its width also plays a role. Trimming branches will be difficult if the blade or 'bit' are too wide. In contrast, if these parts are too thin, the axe is more likely to become lodged in larger logs.


Faqs

What kind of maintenance does an axe require?

Regular axe sharpening may be necessary if you use the tool frequently. Keep an eye out for symptoms of rust, as nicks are a regular problem. Prevent rust by rubbing oil on the blade's head before packing it away. Oiling wood-handled axes may also be necessary to keep the wood strong and beautiful.

Do I need a splitting maul, splitting axe, or hatchet?

With a larger head, splitting mauls can be used as hammers or hammered into enormous rounds once they've been jammed in place. Sharper heads and the absence of the maul head are prominent features of splitting axes They may have a shorter handle and a flat backside for pounding. Splitting axes are more versatile than regular axes when it comes to a variety of tasks. Splitting mauls and axes are longer than hatchets. You can store and swing them more easily if you only need to split them for camping excursions or backyard fires.

What is the best steel for hatchets?

Hand-forged high carbon steel hatchets, which are easy to resharpen but must be safeguarded from corrosion, are the most expensive hatchets. The best hatchet for everyday use is a stainless-steel hatchet, because it won't rust.

What is the advantage of a wooden handle?

Wooden hatchet handles, or hafts, might be more comfortable than rubber or leather handles. Wooden tools give a comfortable grip and reduce noise and vibration from chopping and hammering. Hatchets may last virtually indefinitely with only a little maintenance.


Conclusion

With a hatchet, whether it's an all-purpose model or one designed for camping or emergency situations, the experience of using one is an enjoyable one. You'll be shocked at how swiftly and how much pleasure it is to swing a well-made hatchet if you match the model and design to the task at hand.


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